coaching

Breaking Muscle: The Myth of Exercise and Weight Loss

Great article by Coach Eric Stevens. His opening is right on point…

When it comes down to it, there are only three legitimate reasons to exercise: 
  1. To improve your health
  2. To improve your level of fitness (i.e., your level of endurance, strength, flexibility, etc.)
  3. Because you like it.

…And so is his take away:

The single biggest cause of the obesity epidemic was the added sugar in processed and packaged foods that was introduced into the mainstream food supply in the late 70s and early 80s. Previously named culprits such as decreased physical activity, increased sedentary activities due to technology (television, computers, etc.), and a migration from active jobs towards sedentary professional jobs were all well under way as societal trends from 1900-1980. But the CDC statistics show that despite such changes in our society, the percentage of overweight or obese adults stayed roughly the same until 1980, when our food supply started changing dramatically. At that point, the continuous rise in obesity started – a rise that persists today.

One thing he misses in that conclusion is that 1980 is also when the federal government decided to start telling Americans how to eat. Specifically, this began the demonization of fats in the diet, which prompted both people and the food industry to pursue carbohydrates, under the mistake impression that carbohydrates were healthy. I don’t blame the food industry for their products, either. Their job is to make money. You don’t want products with added sugars? Don’t buy them. Think consumer power doesn’t matter? The entire organics movement is consumer driven, despite the fact that there is almost no evidence of the health benefits of organic products.

If you ran a food company of any kind, you’d be focused on making money…don’t kid yourself…and, you’d deliver what people wanted. Now, over time, you may shape choices and direct people to new, healthier items, but all business is about profitability. If you want to teach big food a lesson, teach yourself a lesson or two first about how to eat and why you cannot outrun, outlift, outswim a horrible diet.

Breaking Muscle: The Myth of Exercise and Weight Loss. http://google.com/newsstand/s/CBIwx4-0mis